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03-Jul-2016 04:48

12.12 / 13 – 01.02/2014 Galerie Xippas, Paris To investigate a specific place, the artist selects real situations, applies the carefully crafted lens of sociology, history, and geology, and transforms them into new and sometimes even imaginary ones.Here, the scientific methods of analysis flirt with the literary world and real-life facts meld with illustrations, rendering ambiguous the relations between text and image.In the same vein as his past works, Jorge Satorre begins with specific situations that are insignificant or abnormal in order to understand places and concrete realities, producing something akin to Carlo Ginzburg’s .

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Inspired by the miniature lead soldiers invented in Germany in the 1800s, Satorre draws a parallel between playfulness and Colonialism – which is responsible for numerous ecological devastations.

In Jorge Satorre’s work, the scientific method is chock-full of symbolism.

By manipulating reality, the artist instills uncertainty and rumors. The emic approach studies the way local populations think whereas the etic approach stresses the outside observer’s viewpoint.

His artwork focusing on the Haast’s Eagle draws on the Maori legend, which tells of a giant eagle named Hokioi who was capable of capturing people.

A few bones from this animal were found on the Southern end of the island in 1871 and are now in a museum in Canterbury.

Inspired by the miniature lead soldiers invented in Germany in the 1800s, Satorre draws a parallel between playfulness and Colonialism – which is responsible for numerous ecological devastations.In Jorge Satorre’s work, the scientific method is chock-full of symbolism.By manipulating reality, the artist instills uncertainty and rumors. The emic approach studies the way local populations think whereas the etic approach stresses the outside observer’s viewpoint.His artwork focusing on the Haast’s Eagle draws on the Maori legend, which tells of a giant eagle named Hokioi who was capable of capturing people.A few bones from this animal were found on the Southern end of the island in 1871 and are now in a museum in Canterbury.While working on these projects, Jorge Satorre invited two political cartoonists – Guy Body from New Zealand and El Fisgon from Mexico – to participate to the show.